Autodesk Maya – Polygons Texture Tutorial


Title: Autodesk Maya – Polygons Texture Tutorial
Mentor Henry (MSN)

Step 1
Select the Polygons menu set

Polygon Menu

Polygon Menu

Step 2
Make sure Display > UI Elements > Help Line is turned on. You will use the Help Line while modeling.

Display > UI Elements > Helpline (Tick)

Display > UI Elements > Helpline (Tick)

Step 3
Ensure that the interactive creation option for primitives is turned off by selecting Create > Polygon Primitives > Interactive Creation. The option is off when a check mark does not display beside the item’s name in the menu.

Create > Polygon Primitive > Interactive Creation

Create > Polygon Primitive > Interactive Creation

Step 4
now lets start with creating a cracker box ^^
1. Select Create > Polygon Primitives > Cube > [].
2. In the Polygon Cube Options window, select Edit > Reset Settings, set the following options, and then click Create:
* Width: 8
* Height: 10
* Depth: 3
* Width divisions: 1
* Height divisions: 1
* Depth divisions: 1
* Axis: Y
* Create UVs: On
* Normalize: Off

Create > Polygon Primitive > Cube

Create > Polygon Primitive > Cube


Polygon Cube Settings

Polygon Cube Settings

Step 5
after you done a box, dubble click on the box then a menu should pop up at the right corner
then right click on one of the edge, select pcube

Step 6
after you’ve done that Rename the pCube1 primitive to: cracker_box
then go to polycube1 and change the width to 8, and height to 10 and depth to 3

Polycube1 Settings

Polycube1 Settings

Step 7
now Applying a texture map to a polygon mesh
1. In the scene view, select Shading > Smooth Shade All from the panel menu.

Shading > Smooth Shade All

Shading > Smooth Shade All

Step 8
ok now, In the scene view, right-click on any region of the cracker box and select Assign New Material > Lambert from the marking menu.

Right-click and hold your mouse cursor on shaded box

Right-click and hold your mouse cursor on shaded box


Lambert > Attribute Editor

Lambert > Attribute Editor

Step 9
A new Lambert shading material is created and assigned to the cracker box.
The Attribute Editor appears and displays the various attributes for the new Lambert shading material.
In Attribute Editor, double-click in the lambert2 box and then type: box_material to rename the shading material.

Rename default name to box_material

Rename default name to box_material

Step 10
In the Attribute Editor, move the Color slider fully to the right so that the color box appears white.

Move Color Slider fully to the right

Move Color Slider fully to the right

Results: You should get something like this…

Autodesk Polygon Texture Result 1

Autodesk Polygon Texture Result 1

Step 10
Click the Map button located to the right of the Color slider.

Click the map button located right of color slider

Click the map button located right of color slider

Step 11
after you done that, The Create Render Node window appears and lists the various texture options you can apply (or connect) to the color channel of the box material.

Step 12
Download this file from megaupload or mediafire (ducky psd file)
select gettingstartedlessons/rendering/sourceimages/UVLesson.psd
Open UVLesson.psd with photoshop

Step 13
Click PSD File from the list of 2D Textures.

Within Create Render Node Window > Click PSD

Within Create Render Node Window > Click PSD


Select the PSD file from the downloaded attachment

Select the PSD file from the downloaded attachment


Result of Ducky PSD

Result of Ducky PSD

Step 14
In the scene view, select Shading > Hardware Texturing from the panel menu to display the texture map on the cracker box model. (Click the word “hardware texturing”). After you click it, it will be tick (activated!)

Select Shading > Hardware Texturing (click the text)

Select Shading > Hardware Texturing (click the text)

Step 15
To open the UV Texture Editor in a two pane layout:
In the scene view, right-click any of the Quick Layout buttons on the Toolbox to display the pop-up menu of Quick Layout shortcuts and select Persp/UV Texture Editor from the list.

Quick Layout shortcuts and select Persp/UV Texture Editor.

Quick Layout shortcuts and select Persp/UV Texture Editor.

Note
If the texture map for the cracker box doesn’t appear in the 2D view, select Image > Update PSD Networks in the UV Texture Editor to refresh the 2D view of the UV Texture Editor. Update PSD Network is normally used to refresh a PSD texture in Maya after you have modified the PSD texture in Adobe® Photoshop®.

In this example, the UVs for the cracker box appear like a box where all six sides have been cut open and then unfolded flat. (The box must be selected first, and use mouse scroller to zoom out.)

The texture map does not appear correctly on the cracker box for a number of reasons:

    Reason #1
    The UVs for the cracker box extend well beyond the default 0 to 1 UV range for the texture map in the 2D view of the UV Texture Editor. As the texture map displays within the 0 to 1 range, the UVs should also be positioned to fit within the 0 to 1 UV range, in most cases. Otherwise, the texture map repeats on the surface mesh, as it does in this case.

    Reason #2
    The position of the UVs do not match the specific regions of the image we’ve provided for the texture map. The regions of the image show the front, back, top, bottom, and sides of the box. The UVs should specifically match these regions to display the texture correctly. UVs do not automatically align themselves to a texture, you must manually reposition them.

    Reason #3
    The shape of the UVs don’t match the aspect ratio of the cracker box model in the scene view: -10 (Height) X 8 (Width) X 3 (Depth). This is because the default UVs for a Maya cube primitive are created based on a predetermined default shape and do not get updated if the shape or scale of the primitive is modified later on.

There are a number of things you can do to correct these issues depending on the situation. For this lesson, you will correct the UV and texture map misalignment by doing the following:

    Solution #1
    Map a new set of UVs for the cracker box model that better matches the individual faces of the cracker box. (While the existing UVs could be modified, you’ll learn how to create new UVs in this lesson that will better match the size and scale of the 3D model.

    Solution #2
    Ensure the new UVs fit within the 0 to 1 UV range in the UV Texture Editor.

    Solution #3
    Reposition the UVs so that they correlate to specific locations on the 2D image using the UV Texture Editor. This will ensure that the various sides of the box receive the correct regions of the texture map.

Note
Have you right clicked on the cracker box and selected object mode?
object mode is, when you press on the box once then the whole box will get marked. And faces is when you only want to selected one side.
First select the cracker box(it should be marked with green lines) then click on the UV editor then zoom out

Step 17
Let’s start with Mapping UV texture coordinates
It is often necessary to create new UVs for a surface mesh in order to texture map it correctly. These situations include:

  • Texture mapping a surface that doesn’t have existing UVs.
  • This can occur when you import 3D models from other software applications that don’t create UVs.
    When the UVs for a surface are badly jumbled or are missing some UVs.
    This can occur when a surface has been edited or modified in some way and it becomes hard to determine what UVs may be missing as a result.

  • When you need a unique set of UVs for a particular purpose.
  • For example, if you want to paint a texture map directly onto a 3D surface, you may want to map UVs that allow you to paint using the 3D paint tools in Maya. Alternatively, you may want to create a unique set of UVs specifically for baking textures or light maps.

    Maya lets you create UVs for polygonal and subdivision surfaces using a process called projection mapping, also referred to as mapping UVs. Maya provides several projection mapping types that map what gets viewed by a particular projection to a flat 2D view that can be subsequently correlated to your texture map using the UV Texture Editor.

    In this lesson, you use a feature called Automatic Mapping to create new UVs for the cracker box model. Automatic mapping lets you specify the number of planes that will be used for the UV projection.

    Automatic Mapping is normally used when mapping UVs that require multiple projections of organic shaped models as it has the advantage of producing UVs that are proportional in scale to the world space area of the mesh faces of the surface.

    Automatic mapping is useful when your mapping requirements are for non-overlapping UVs which fit within the 0 to 1 texture space, but which do not have to be contiguous; for example, when using the 3D Paint tool, Maya® Paint EffectsTM, Maya® FurTM or Maya® HairTM.

    You use Automatic Mapping in this lesson because it can produce a UV projection from three planar directions simultaneously which makes it a good choice for the shape of the cracker box model. That is, you can map UVs for the front and back, top and bottom and the two sides in one operation. This projection type is referred to as a triplanar projection.

    To map UVs using Automatic Mapping

    1. In the perspective view, select the cracker box as an Object.
    2. From the Polygons menu set, select Create UVs > Automatic Mapping > .

    The Automatic Mapping Options window appears.

    3. In the Automatic Mapping Options window, select Edit > Reset settings, set the following options, and then click Project:
    * Planes: 3
    * Percentage Space: 2

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10 responses to “Autodesk Maya – Polygons Texture Tutorial”

  1. James H. Williams says :

    If you have more Maya 2010 tutorials, please email me, so I can print them out. Thanks!

  2. James H. Williams says :

    Thank You for your tutorial on Polygons Texture for Maya 2010. Your tutorial is a much easier to follow tutorial than the one I downloaded from Autodesk. You show all the steps with a picture of what to do. I got to Mapping UV texture coordinates in the Autodesk version, and I was lost. Thanks again! If you have more Maya 2010 tutorials on the web, please let me know, so I can print them out.

  3. David Leicester says :

    Thanks, great tutorial

  4. HR says :

    Thanks for the tutorial, I have only one problem, everything goes perfect, until I try to move, rotate the cracker box once it´s “mapped and texture applied on it”…
    The object moves or rotate, but the image applied don´t follow the move…I’ve checked twice step by step, but can’t find what I did wrong … It´s pretty basic, I know, but I really would appreciate any help on this topic… Thank you very much

    HR

  5. Laura says :

    This was so helpful! It is the clearest description I have found yet for how the uv’s correlate with the Texture Editor. Very much appreciated!
    Laura

  6. birendra singh andana says :

    thanks. very goods tutorial it is very useful for trainers

  7. Gianca says :

    very good tutorial! thank you!

  8. arnel says :

    yea thanks for the maya tutorial this was really good

  9. anim says :

    thanks for this tutorial. very useful and complete.

  10. Jane Goody says :

    This is very hot information. I think I’ll share it on Facebook.

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